Archive for June, 2013

Weekend Video: David Blaine: How I held my breath for 17 min

June 29, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
Posted in: books

Book Recommendation: The End of Lawyers?: Rethinking the nature of legal services

This widely acclaimed legal bestseller has provoked a tidal wave of debate within the legal profession, being hailed as an inspiration by some and as heresy by others. Susskind lays down a challenge to all lawyers, and indeed all those in a professional service environment. He urges them to ask themselves, with their hands on their hearts, what elements of their current workload could be undertaken differently – more quickly, cheaply, efficiently, or to a higher quality – using
alternative methods of working. The challenge for legal readers is to identify their distinctive skills and talents, the capabilities that they possess that cannot, crudely, be replaced by advanced systems or by less costly workers supported by technology or standard processes, or by lay people armed
with online self-help tools.

In the extended new preface to this revised paperback edition, Richard Susskind updates his views on legal process outsourcing, courtroom technology, access to justice, e-learning for lawyers, and the impact of the recession on the practice of law. He analyses the four main pressures that lawyers now face (to charge less, to work differently, to embrace technology, and to deregulate), and reveals common fallacies associated with each. And, in an entirely new line of thinking, Susskind argues
that law firms and in-house departments will have four business models from which to choose in the future, and he provides some new tools and techniques to help lawyers plan for their future.

Susskind argues that the market is increasingly unlikely to tolerate expensive lawyers for tasks (guiding, advising, drafting, researching, problem-solving, and more) that can equally or better be discharged, directly or indirectly, by smart systems and processes. It follows, the book claims, that the jobs of many traditional lawyers will be substantially eroded and often eliminated. Two forces propel the legal profession towards this scenario: a market pull towards commoditisation and a
pervasive development and uptake of information technology. At the same time, the book foresees new law jobs emerging which may be highly rewarding, even if very different from those of today.

The End of Lawyers represents a compelling vision of the future of the legal profession and a must-read for all lawyers. Indeed this book should be read by all those whose work touches on the law, and it offers much food for thought for anyone working in a professional environment.

 
Available from Amazon

June 26, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
Posted in: books

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons,24th June 2013

This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including Lawyers Uncovered. He also does the cartoons for BabyBarista and has had two more excellent books published recently: 101 Ways to Leave the Law and 101 Uses for a Useless Banker. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

June 24, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

Weekend Video: Lord Bingham – The Rule of Law

June 22, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
Posted in: books

Book Recommendation: Rumpole Rests His Case

Rumpole Rests His Case – seven hilarious stories starring John Mortimer’s unforgettable barrister

The comic, courageous, and corpulent Horace Rumpole reenters the fray in these seven fresh and funny stories in which the “great defender of muddled and sinful humanity” triumphs over the forces of prejudice and mean-mindedness while he tiptoes precariously through the domestic territory of his wife, Hilda-She Who Must Be Obeyed! With his passion for poetry, and a nose equally sensitive to the whiff of wrongdoing and the bouquet of a Ch�teau Thames Embankment, the lovable and disheveled Rumpole “is at his rumpled best” (The New York Times).

These seven wonderful Rumpole stories will be loved by fans of John Mortimer, as well as readers of Sherlock Holmes, P.D. James and P.G. Wodehouse.

‘One of the great comic creations of modern times’ Evening Standard
‘There is a truth in Rumpole that is told with brilliance and grace’ Daily Telegraph

‘Rumpole remains and absolute delight’ The Times

Sir John Mortimer was a barrister, playwright and novelist. His fictional political trilogy of Paradise Postponed, Titmuss Regained and The Sound of Trumpets has recently been republished in Penguin Classics, together with Clinging to the Wreckage and his play A Voyage round My Father. His most famous creation was the barrister Horace Rumpole, who featured in four novels and around eighty short stories. His books in Penguin include: The Anti-social Behaviour of Horace Rumpole; The Collected Stories of Rumpole; The First Rumpole Omnibus; Rumpole and the Angel of Death; Rumpole and the Penge Bungalow Murders; Rumpole and the Primrose Path; Rumpole and the Reign of Terror; Rumpole and the Younger Generation; Rumpole at Christmas; Rumpole Rests His Case; The Second Rumpole Omnibus; Forever Rumpole; In Other Words; Quite Honestly and Summer’s Lease.

Available from Amazon

June 19, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
Posted in: books

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons,17th June 2013

This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including Lawyers Uncovered. He also does the cartoons for BabyBarista and has had two more excellent books published recently: 101 Ways to Leave the Law and 101 Uses for a Useless Banker. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

June 17, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

Weekend Video: Steve Jobs in Sweden, 1985

June 15, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
Posted in: books

Legal aid cuts will not only bring injustice but also increased costs @theiclr

Brought to you by our friends at the ICLR

HeadClerk

HeadClerk called an emergency Chambers Meeting yesterday. “I’m afraid that we need a bit of a shake-up of our practice structure.”
A general groan before OldSmoothie said, “Yes, yes. Time for us all to work harder and bring in a few more solicitors.”
“Quite the contrary,” said HeadClerk. “In the light of the government’s proposed cuts to legal aid I want everyone to make a conscious effort instead to start shedding solicitors…criminal ones that is.”
“But that makes up half of my practice,” said BusyBody.
“And that’s all the criminal law will be from now on in this chambers…” said HeadClerk, “…practise. A place to learn a bit of advocacy and then move on. If the government’s taking away the cash I’m not having my barristers wasting their time for less money than they could get doing a paper round. So from now on, criminal law is for pupils only.”
“But…what about the serious criminal matters?” said BusyBody.
“It’s all serious when it comes to someone’s liberty,” said TheVamp.
“And so is paying the rent on this expensive chambers,” said HeadClerk. “So if anyone wants to do charity work they can do it away from here. In the meantime, the pupils get the lot.”
The pupils looked horrified at the prospect of suddenly being thrown in at the deep end of the criminal law.
“You see, this is the problem,” said UpTights. “They’ll pay a pittance up front, think they’ve saved a few pounds and then find that suddenly appeals and compensation claims start exploding all over the place.”
“It’s always the same,” said OldSmoothie. “Whenever the government starts trying to reduce legal fees at the expense of justice, they just start a whole new line of appellate work.”
“They’d be better off getting their own house in order if they really want to save costs,” said BusyBody. “The amount of adjournments I’ve seen which could easily have been avoided with better organisation is ridiculous.”
“In the meantime,” said HeadClerk, “I think we’d better get our pupils access to the ICLR online since I fear they’ll be needing more than the Highway Code this year.”
“Well at least the ICLR is one constant we can rely on,” said OldRuin, “even when the rest of the legal world is in complete turmoil.”

June 12, 2013 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: ICLR

Book Recommendation: More Weird Cases

The first book in this series, Weird Cases, was published in 2009 and contained cases which had been dealt with by the courts in the previous two years. The parade of extraordinary human disputes and irregularities that are heard in law courts has, however, run on unabated since then. More Weird Cases provides a further instalment of extraordinary cases from around the world that have featured in the author’s popular column in The Times Online.

Available from Amazon

June 12, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
Posted in: books

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons,10th June 2013

This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including Lawyers Uncovered. He also does the cartoons for BabyBarista and has had two more excellent books published recently: 101 Ways to Leave the Law and 101 Uses for a Useless Banker. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

June 10, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized