Archive for the ‘books’ Category

‘Proof of Death’ by thriller-writer and barrister Chris Pearson

Lawyer Richard Troy doesn’t do mathematics. But when he accepts Chechen number theorist Aslan Ivanov as a client, he realises that life, love and death are all part of the same equation. Aslan possesses a proof of the Riemann Hypothesis – a mathematical proposition that has defied academics for 150 years. With the power to unlock public key encryption across the internet, blowing open all online financial transactions in the process, the proof is priceless. Aslan’s friend, Anthony Heims, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, secretly envies Aslan for it. American banker Clayton Ruck will pay anything to have it. Siberian assassin Colonel Vladimir Tutov will stop at nothing to get it. Forced to defend much more than Aslan’s legal rights, Troy becomes a reluctant number in Ruck’s and Tutov’s deadly calculations. The more Troy learns of Aslan’s story, the further he strays from his role as a lawyer. Suddenly, Troy is no longer crossing swords with courtroom opponents. Now the weapons are real, his adversaries merciless. And no judge will step in to save him from slaughter.” Available on Kindle from Amazon.

March 2, 2015 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: books

Book recommendation: RTA Allegations of Fraud in a post-Jackson Era: the Handbook by Andrew Mckie

A practical, concise and easy to read handbook dealing with allegations of fraud in personal injury RTA cases. From LVI to alleged staged accidents, this book covers all the main fraud topics including relevant cases, law and practical guidance that can be used by both junior and more senior fee earners in day-to-day practice in this complex and evolving area of law. Andrew Mckie is a Barrister at Clerksroom Manchester specialising in claimant and defendant personal injury, with a particular interest in cases involving alleged fraud and credit hire. He was called to the Bar in 2011 and before that was an Associate Solicitor and Solicitor Advocate. Before qualifying as a barrister, Andrew had over six years of advocacy experience as a Solicitor. He worked for a number of leading firms and dealt with both RTA fraud and credit hire and worked for both claimant and defendant firms. Most recently, he was the Head of Litigation and In-House Solicitor Advocate at a claimant personal injury and credit hire firm.

Available from Amazon.

April 14, 2014 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: books

My Foreword to ‘Wig Betrayed’ by Charles Courtley

Below is the Foreword to Wig Betrayed by Charles Courtley that is now available to buy on amazon.co.uk.

I’m delighted and honoured to have been asked to write the foreword to this wonderful novel which follows on from the excellent Wig Begone. The author follows in a rich tradition of fiction-writing from barristers and former barristers, including the great John Mortimer’s creation Rumpole of the Bailey and my own personal favourite Henry Cecil’s Brothers in Law.

In this volume we meet an older and more experienced Charles Courtley whose life seems to be in many ways out of his own control. But as he also starts to lose direction as to what is important to him and his world falls apart around him a tiny light begins to flicker to life offering up the hope of redemption.

I know from my own experience that writing a second novel can be more of a challenge than the first and in doing so the author has produced not only a cracking yarn but also one with real pathos where the strains and responsibilities of legal life can sometimes really take their toll. Added to this is the fact that whilst the story itself is fiction, the details are authentic and open a window for the reader onto the little known world of military justice. All in all a great page-turner of a book that I would heartily recommend.

April 6, 2014 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: books

Book Recommendation: The New Penguin Guide to the Law by John Pritchard

 

This book is established as the best home reference guide to the law. It covers all aspects of the subject in an easy, accessible style which cuts through the legalease of the normal law guides.

New topics covered in the fifth edition include pensions, child support changes, tax credits, squatters, unmarried fathers and parental responsibility, pre-nuptial contracts, the Adoption and Children Act 2002, commonhold, leasehold enfranchisement, limited liability partnerships and the Enterprise Act. In particular, there have been extensive updates to the employment section of the book, covering new disciplinary and grievance procedures introduced by the Employment Act 2002, new rights for fixed term and part time workers, adoption leave, paternity leave and maternity leave rights and a new right to request flexible working and changes to discrimination law.

Available from Amazon

 

January 29, 2014 · babybarista · Comments Closed
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Book Recommendation: Sycamore Row by John Grisham

For almost a quarter of a century, John Grisham’s A Time to Kill has captivated readers with its raw exploration of race, retribution, and justice. Now, its hero, Jake Brigance, returns to the courtroom in a dramatic showdown as Ford County again confronts its tortured history. Filled with the intrigue, suspense and plot twists that are the hallmarks of the world’s favourite storyteller, SYCAMORE ROW is the thrilling story of the elusive search for justice in a small American town.

Available from Amazon

January 22, 2014 · babybarista · Comments Closed
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Book Recommendation: The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus: 20 Years of Cartoons from the Times 1993-2013 by Alex Steuart Williams

In 1993 the Queen’s Counsel cartoon strip first appeared in the law pages of The Times. The authors were Alex Williams and Graham Defries, two young lawyers determined to make fun of the legal profession even as they attempted to climb its greasy pole. The strip soon settled on a handful of key characters: Sir Geoffrey Bentwood QC, Head of Chambers at 4 Lawn Buildings, a study in pomposity and all-round Master of the Legal Universe; Richard Loophole, ambulance chaser and senior partner at Filibuster and Loophole; and Rachel Underwood, oppressed associate who never quite makes partner no matter how good her work is. The strip has been published continuously in The Times ever since. Collected here for the first time is the author’s personal selection of the very best cartoons over the past 20 years, showing that, despite all the changes in the legal profession in over two decades – nothing much has really changed. These cartoons show Britain’s best-loved legal cartoon satire maturing into ripe middle-age; good-natured, funny, and a bit flabby around the middle.

Available from Amazon

January 15, 2014 · babybarista · Comments Closed
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Book Recommendation: An Officer and a Spy by Robert Harris

They lied to protect their country. He told the truth to save it. A gripping historical thriller from the bestselling author of FATHERLAND.

January 1895. On a freezing morning in the heart of Paris, an army officer, Georges Picquart, witnesses a convicted spy, Captain Alfred Dreyfus, being publicly humiliated in front of twenty thousand spectators baying ‘Death to the Jew!’

The officer is rewarded with promotion: Picquart is made the French army’s youngest colonel and put in command of ‘the Statistical Section’ – the shadowy intelligence unit that tracked down Dreyfus.

The spy, meanwhile, is given a punishment of medieval cruelty: Dreyfus is shipped off to a lifetime of solitary confinement on Devil’s Island – unable to speak to anyone, not even his guards, his case seems closed forever.

But gradually Picquart comes to believe there is something rotten at the heart of the Statistical Section. When he discovers another German spy operating on French soil, his superiors are oddly reluctant to pursue it. Despite official warnings, Picquart persists, and soon the officer and the spy are in the same predicament.

Narrated by Picquart, An Officer and a Spy is a compelling recreation of a scandal that became the most famous miscarriage of justice in history. Compelling, too, are the echoes for our modern world: an intelligence agency gone rogue, justice corrupted in the name of national security, a newspaper witch-hunt of a persecuted minority, and the age-old instinct of those in power to cover-up their crimes.

Available from Amazon

January 8, 2014 · babybarista · Comments Closed
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Book Recommendation: A Voyage Round My Father by John Mortimer

John Mortimer’s autobiographical play is the affectionate portrait of a son’s relationship with his father. Growing up in the shadow of the brilliant barrister, who adored his garden and hated visitors, and whose blindness was never mentioned, the son continually yearns for his father’s love and respect.
A Voyage Round My Father opened in June 2006 at the Donmar Theatre, London starring Derek Jacobi.

Available from Amazon

January 1, 2014 · babybarista · Comments Closed
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Book Recommendation: The Colour of Law by Mark Giminez

A. Scott Fenney is a hotshot corporate lawyer at a big Dallas firm. At 33, in the prime of his life, he rakes in $750,000 a year, drives a Ferrari and comes home every night to a mansion in Dallas’s most exclusive neighbourhood. He also comes home to one of Dallas’s most beautiful women, with whom he has a much-loved daughter, Boo. For Fenney, life could not be better.

But when a senator’s son is killed in a hit-and-run, Fenney is asked by the state judge to put his air-conditioned lifestyle on hold to defend the accused: a black, heroin-addicted prostitute – a very different client to the people Fenney usually represents. And, more importantly, she is not going be paying Ford Stevens $350 an hour for the privilege of his services.

Under fire from all sides, Fenney drafts in a public defender to take the case on. Yet as Scott prepares to hand over to Bobby, he feels increasingly guilty about the path he is taking, because Scott still believes in the principle of justice.

The question is: does he believe in it strongly enough to jeopardise everything in his life he holds dear? And to what lengths is the dead man’s power-hungry father prepared to go to test Fenney’s resolve?

Available from Amazon

December 25, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
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Book Recommendation: What About Law?: Studying Law at University

Most young people considering studying law, or pursuing a legal career, have very little idea of what learning law involves and how universities teach law to their students. The new edition of this book, which proved very popular when first published in 2007, provides a ‘taster’ for the study of law; a short, accessible presentation of law as an academic subject, designed to help 17- and 18-year old students and others decide whether law is the right choice for them as a university subject, or, if they have already made the choice, what to expect when they start their law degree. It helps answer the question ‘what should I study at university?’ and counters the perception that law is a dry, dull subject. “What About Law?” shows how the study of law can be fun, intellectually stimulating, challenging and of direct relevance to students. Using a case study approach, the book introduces prospective law students to the legal system, as well as to legal reasoning, critical thinking and argument. This is a book that should be in the library of every school with a sixth form, every college and every university, and it is one that any student about to embark on the study of law should read before they commence their legal studies. All of the authors have long experience in teaching law at Cambridge and elsewhere and all have also been involved, at various times, in advising prospective law students at open days and admissions conferences. Listed as one of the Six of the best law books that a future law student should read by the Guardian Law Online, 8th August 2012.

Available from Amazon

December 18, 2013 · babybarista · Comments Closed
Posted in: books