Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon

This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

November 16, 2020 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon

This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

November 9, 2020 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon

This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

November 2, 2020 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon

This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

October 26, 2020 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon

This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

October 19, 2020 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon

This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

October 12, 2020 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

Why You Need an 18-Wheeler Accident Attorney

Consideration was given for the editing and publication of this post.

Most personal injury attorneys in the USA have handled car accidents. They may have aided the pedestrian hit by a car or the passenger injured in a drunk driving case. However, most attorneys lack the experience and expertise to handle the more complex cases involving tractor trailers also known as 18-wheelers.

The Severity of the Damages


Force equals mass times acceleration. It takes more energy to get a truck to high speed than a car. That’s why the car hit by an 18-wheeler will suffer far more damage than if struck by another car traveling at the same speed. This can result in a car wrapped around the 18-wheeler, not the dented car doors you’ll see with a standard T-bone accident. This causes bones to break, traumatic brain injuries and, all too frequently, death. The associated medical bills, property damage, lost wages and long-term costs to be far greater in an 18-wheeler accident than other types of car accidents. You need an attorney who regularly handles in serious commercial vehicle accidents to be able to accurately predict the total, lifetime costs of a given accident.

The Complex Liability in Most Cases

A semi truck accident could be due to the negligence of the driver. However, the accident might be the result of several other parties, as well. A driver who simply drives the company’s vehicles may have nothing to do with its upkeep. Then they aren’t responsible for the faulty breaks or worn tires. The truck might be maintained by a fleet management service separate from the company whose name graces the side of the 18-wheeler. The hard part is determining what caused the accident, who or what groups are liable, and in what degree.

This is why you must work with an experienced 18 wheeler accident lawyer. Pick any generic personal injury attorney, and your odds of winning your case and receiving the full damages you’re due go down dramatically. Furthermore, you want to make sure that you’re working with an attorney who doesn’t take on truck companies as clients.

The Investigation


A conventional car crash investigation will start by asking for the contact information of witnesses and pictures you took at the scene. Unfortunately, you can’t do this if you’re rendered comatose when a truck crashes into you. These accidents generally trigger a police report, when you have to request one in lesser car accidents. When the damage is severe or a death results, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration might get involved, but the local transit authority will probably generate its own report.

The average 18-wheeler is driven by a professional driver. This means that an investigation will include their traffic record and commercial driving certifications as well as ask whether or not they were too tired or drunk to be driving. The track record of the company that owns and maintains the vehicle will come into question, too. The best 18-wheeler accident attorneys are familiar with every source of information related to any crash in Houston, allowing them to quickly compile the information related to your case. And this means they won’t waste your time asking you about what you may not remember.

October 5, 2020 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon

This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

October 5, 2020 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

Who Can You Sue Following A Car Accident That’s Not Your Fault?

Consideration was given for the editing and publication of this post.

After a car accident, insurance adjusters must determine who is at fault to decide who pays and calculate how much they should pay. The process for determining fault varies from state to state. Georgia and Tennessee are both “at-fault” states, which means that whoever caused the accident must pay for resulting damages. However, like any business, insurance companies aim to pay as little as possible. You may not be satisfied with the settlement the insurance company offers, especially if you’ve sustained serious injuries or your vehicle was totaled in the accident. These expenses often amount to much more than an insurance company is willing to give you. In this case, you can sue the at-fault driver(s) to get a better outcome.

Understandably, most people want to avoid a lawsuit at all costs. They can be lengthy, expensive, and work-intensive. In many cases, a GA car accident lawyer can successfully negotiate with the at-fault insurers on your behalf, and you never have to step into a courtroom. But on occasion, a lawsuit is the only available resource against a particularly stubborn insurer. And, if your odds are good, it can be well worth it. An experienced TN injury lawyer can review your case and determine the likelihood of winning a lawsuit.

Filing a Lawsuit After a Car Accident

Following a car accident, you may want to file a lawsuit to help alleviate the cost of vehicle repairs, medical bills, lost wages, or pain and suffering. Depending on the circumstances of your accident, there are several different parties you can sue. 

Suing the At-Fault Driver

If your accident involved only one other driver, you will deal with one other insurance company. In Tennessee and Georgia, all motorists must adequately insure their cars. If the insurance company fails to offer a fair settlement, you can sue the at-fault driver, but you’ll be effectively suing the insurance company for fair compensation.

Just because insuring your vehicle is the law doesn’t mean everyone complies. If the at-fault driver does not have insurance, you can file a negligence lawsuit directly against him/her. However, be advised that a lawsuit against an uninsured driver does not guarantee that you’ll receive damages. Someone who can’t afford car insurance probably can’t afford to pay negligence damages, either.

Suing Multiple At-Fault Drivers

Tennessee and Georgia are comparative fault states, which means that more than one driver can be found responsible for a car accident. As you might imagine, this can complicate claims. Sometimes both drivers share the blame, and other times more than two people are involved in a car accident. 

If you are found partially at fault for the accident, you can still claim damages as long as you were less than 50 percent responsible. If the adjuster finds multiple drivers at fault, all at-fault drivers are liable to pay. Without adequate legal representation, it’s unlikely that any at-fault insurer will offer you the settlement you deserve.

Suing a Negligent Driver as a Passenger

If you were a passenger in the car that caused an injury accident, or a car hit by another vehicle, you can still sue.  

As in the above cases, you would sue the at-fault driver’s insurance, regardless of which car you were in at the time. However, if the at-fault driver does not have insurance, the car you were riding in does matter. If you were in the car of a negligent, uninsured driver, your own automobile insurance would have to assume responsibility for your injuries. If you were in a car that was hit by a negligent, uninsured driver, you would submit a claim to the insurance company of the car you were riding in. 

Other Potentially Liable Individuals 

In some situations, a negligent driver may not own the car they were operating. For example, perhaps they were driving a company-owned vehicle, or their friend loaned them a truck to move. In most cases, you would submit a claim to the owner’s insurance. 

It can become complicated in the case of employers, however. If the negligent driver was operating a personal vehicle as part of their job, you could sue their employer. But if they were running an errand for their employer, and made a personal pitstop along the way, during which they hit your vehicle in a store parking lot, a court may rule that the accident occurred while the employee was on a “detour” from their work responsibility. As such, the employer may not be held liable. Similarly, if the employee took the company car outside of business hours for personal use, their employer may deny responsibility for the employee’s actions. As with all complex legal cases, it’s best to involve a car accident lawyer who is well-versed in Tennessee and Georgia accident law. 

Contact Dennis and King Today

If you have been involved in a not-at-fault car accident in Tennessee or Georgia, the legal team at Dennis and King can help. Injuries and time off work can cause significant emotional and financial strain to a victim’s entire family. Contact us today at (423) 892-5533 for a free and confidential consultation about your case.

October 2, 2020 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized

How to Use the Alternative Measures Program for an Offence

Consideration was given for the editing and publication of this post.

In Canada, charges for even minor crimes can have long-lasting, negative effects on an individual’s life. If you are charged and convicted of a crime, the associated criminal record can severely limit your employment and housing opportunities for years into the future. Fortunately, the Alternative Measures Program (AMP) offers a chance at a clean slate for individuals who commit minor crimes.

What Is the Alternative Measures Program?

The AMP allows certain offenders to avoid conviction by participating in a combination of rehabilitation and restorative justice. The AMP is also known as “diversion,” because it diverts these offenders out of court, and onto (hopefully) a better path forward. When a person is willing to take responsibility for their actions, the Crown can instead offer them alternatives to criminal proceedings. If the accused completes the program satisfactorily, the Crown Prosecutor may drop all charges, effectively removing that offence from the individual’s criminal record. For this reason, the AMP is an attractive option for many people facing minor charges.

Who Is Eligible for the Alternative Measures Program?

Admission to the Alternative Measures Program is at the Crown’s sole discretion, so it depends very much on each individual case. However, if the following factors are present in your unique situation, it will generally bode well for you when determining eligibility:

  • You were charged with a summary conviction offence (minor offence) that did not result in significant damage to persons or property.

  • You have less than two offences on your criminal record.

  • You have not undergone AMP within the past two years.

  • You show remorse for their actions.

  • You are willing to accept responsibility for what happened.

Some examples of minor offences commonly eligible for AMP are:

  • Forging documentation

  • Theft or fraud under $5,000

  • Possession of stolen property under $5,000

  • Mischief (destruction or tampering with property that you do not own) under $5,000

  • Simple assault (excluding domestic violence)

  • Motor vehicle theft

Each province—if it has adopted alternative measures—employs different guidelines for eligibility and restitution acts. A qualified local lawyer can inform you of your province’s specific requirements.

What is the Process for Receiving Alternative Measures?

In some cases, a police officer may refer you to AMP; in other situations, a defence lawyer can recommend you to the program. However, as stated above, the Crown Prosecutor has the ultimate power to decide who receives alternative measures.

If the Crown admits you to the program, you must then formally accept responsibility for your actions. Unlike pleading guilty, accepting responsibility will not result in a conviction and, as such, will not show up on your criminal record. Instead, the court will essentially put your case “on hold” while you complete your required AMP activities. 

The Crown will decide which acts of restitution you must perform based on your province and the nature of your case, among other factors. Some common AMP activities of restitution include:

  • community service;

  • compensation or return of property to the victim; 

  • acts of service to the victim;

  • participation in a reconciliation program for victims and offenders, if the victim is willing; and

  • a written apology or essay.

Once you have completed your AMP, the Crown Prosecutor will review your performance and decide if you have performed the activities to a satisfactory level. If you do not finish the program satisfactorily, the Crown will almost certainly proceed with criminal charges. An unfinished AMP will not carry much favour in the subsequent trial. 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Will an AMP show up on my criminal record?

With very few exceptions, an AMP will not show up on your criminal record. However, the court may take a prior AMP into account when considering charges for any subsequent offences. In addition, you cannot enroll in an AMP within two years of your last admission. 

Are there exceptions that could bar me from receiving alternative measures?

Yes. The Crown Prosecutor will consider any aggravating factors (circumstances that make a crime more serious). According to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, these include but are not limited to:

  • Domestic violence or sexual violence in an assault case;

  • Trafficking controlled substances or Schedule I drugs (e.g. cocaine, methamphetamine, or heroin);

  • Involving a minor (under 18 years old) in a drug offence;

  • Using or threatening to use a weapon; 

  • Using or threatening to use extreme violence;

  • Implementing coordinated and sophisticated planning (e.g., as part of organized crime)

As mentioned above, the unique circumstances surrounding a case will significantly impact the Crown’s decision to offer alternative measures. Consult with a defence attorney if you are unsure how your unique circumstances will affect your case. 

Are juvenile offenders eligible for alternative measures?

Only adult offenders can participate in an alternative measures program. However, the Youth Criminal Justice Act provides extrajudicial measures, which function in much the same way. Juvenile justice laws typically apply extrajudicial measures much more broadly than adult alternative measures. 

How can a lawyer help me take advantage of alternative measures?

An experienced defence lawyer, such as the team at Oykhman Criminal Defence Toronto, will review your case and make a compelling argument to the Crown Prosecutor in favour of alternative measures. Many factors influence your admission to this program, so it’s best to seek legal counsel to increase your chances of success.

October 1, 2020 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
Posted in: Uncategorized