Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon
This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

August 3, 2015 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
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Book recommendation: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition Paperback by Harper Lee

‘Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ’em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’ A lawyer’s advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee’s classic novel – a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with exuberant humour the irrationality of adult attitudes to race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina of one man’s struggle for justice. But the weight of history will only tolerate so much. To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story, an anti-racist novel, a historical drama of the Great Depression and a sublime example of the Southern writing tradition.

Available from Amazon.

July 29, 2015 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
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No touchy feely at the Bar

“I feel that the Apple Watch is going to take off, you know,” said PupilFodder.
“Young lady,” said HeadofChambers sternly, “psychologists feel, not barristers.”
She looked flustered and started to correct herself with: “Oh, sorry, I believe that…”
“Believe? Believe?” said HeadofChambers, his voice rising. “Only priests believe my dear. Barristers are not paid to do either feelings or beliefs. They are instead paid to give their esteemed opinions.”
“Oh.”
“So from now on, no feelings, no beliefs. Got it?”
Er, right…

July 28, 2015 · Tim Kevan · No Comments
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Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon
This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

July 27, 2015 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
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Weekend video: Chris Burkard: The joy of surfing in ice-cold water

July 25, 2015 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
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Book recommendation: Forever Rumpole: The Best of the Rumpole Stories by John Mortimer

Forever Rumpole – a hilarious new selection of the very best Rumpole stories by John Mortimer. Horace Rumpole lives alongside Mr Pickwick and Bertie Wooster as one of the immortal comic characters in English fiction. With his curmudgeonly wit, his literary allusions, his disdain for personal ambition and his lack of pomposity, he has, in the words of the Daily Telegraph, ‘ascended to the pantheon of literary immortals’.

Available from Amazon.

July 22, 2015 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
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The joys of being self-employed

“You know, alternative business structures are going to lead to us all working for solicitors firms,” said UpTights at chambers tea today.
“Yeh right, as if we, the Bar, are going to do that,” said OldSmoothie.
“But you already do,” said TheBusker, breaking it to him gently.
“Oh, hmm, well, maybe so technically, but we don’t actually work, work. We, you know, deign to give them a little of our valuable time.”
“In return for cash,” added TheBusker, again looking at him sympathetically.
“But that’s not the same as working. You know, like being employed.”
“You’re right there,” said TheVamp. “I love waiting two or three years for payment. I mean who’d want a regular pay cheque when bank loans will fill the hole?”
“And I just can’t get over how good that cold empty frightened feeling is in your stomach when your diary becomes empty, your paperwork dries up and you still have a mortgage to pay. It’s the kind of thing which makes me just skip to work,” said BusyBody.
“Then there’s the sick pay, company cars and pensions which we definitely wouldn’t want to receive,” said TheBusker.
“Not to mention paternity pay,” BusyBody added looking pointedly at OldSmoothie who is still the bookies’ (ie the clerks’) favourite to be revealed as the father of her child.
The room was silent as everyone contemplated the joys of being self-employed.

July 21, 2015 · Tim Kevan · 3 Comments
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Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon
This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at £120 for originals and £40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email info@qccartoon.com.

July 20, 2015 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
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Weekend video: Becoming a Barrister – Q&A

July 18, 2015 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
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Book recommendation: The Great Defender: The Life and Trials of Edward Marshall Hall KC, England’s Greatest Barrister by Edward Marjoribanks (Author) and Gary Bell QC (Introduction)

When Sir Edward Marshall Hall died in 1927 it was the end of an era. Tall, strikingly handsome and charming, the barrister was the finest advocate ever seen in the English criminal courts. Known as ‘The Great Defender’ as he fought tooth and nail for his clients, those in the shadow of the hangman’s noose were often saved from execution by his dramatic and eloquent defence. His closing speeches to rapt juries were legendary and there was never a free seat in the public gallery or on the press bench when he was in the Old Bailey. Marshall Hall did not win every case – the ‘brides in the bath’ murderer George Smith and poisoner Frederick Seddon were sentenced to death – but not without a fight from the amazing advocate. One of his finest victories came in 1894 when he saved the life of Marie Hermann, a former Austrian governess who had resorted to prostitution to feed her three children, one of whom was blind, after her husband abandoned her. Charged with the murder of an elderly client, even she believed she would be hanged. Marshall Hall gave an impassioned plea to the jury which ended with him, with tears on his cheeks and pointing to her in the dock, begging, ‘Look at her, gentlemen of the jury, look at her. God never gave her a chance. Won’t you?’ They did, and she was found not guilty of murder. Despite success in court, Marshall Hall’s personal life was tragic. His first wife, Ethel, whom he adored, informed him on their honeymoon that she could never love him and died in agony following a botched, secret abortion after getting pregnant with her lover’s child. This biography, written by his friend Edward Marjoribanks, with an introduction by criminal barrister Gary Bell QC, details many of the advocate’s famous trials and his life outside court.

Available from Amazon.

July 15, 2015 · Tim Kevan · Comments Closed
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